The Global Matrix 2.0 on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

Released on November 16th, 2016 at the International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health in Bangkok, Thailand.

38

Countries

6

Continents

342

Grades

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The Grades

Search the matrix below with the filters or sort the grades by clicking on the column headers.

The Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance organized the concurrent preparation of Report Cards on the physical activity of children and youth in 38 countries from 6 continents (representing 60% of the world’s population). Nine common indicators were used (Overall Physical Activity, Organized Sport Participation, Active Play, Active Transportation, Sedentary Behavior, Family and Peers, School, Community and the Built Environment, and Government Strategies and Investments), and all Report Cards were generated through a harmonized development process and a standardized grading framework (from A = excellent, to F = failing). The 38 Report Cards were presented at the International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health in Bangkok, Thailand on November 16, 2016. The consolidated findings are summarized in the form of a Global Matrix demonstrating substantial variation in grades both within and across countries. Countries that lead in certain indicators often lag in others.

Average grades for both Overall Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior around the world are D (low/poor). In contrast, the average grade for indicators related to supports for physical activity was C. Lower-income countries generally had better grades on Overall Physical Activity, Active Transportation, and Sedentary Behaviors compared with higher-income countries, yet worse grades for supports from Family and Peers, Community and the Built Environment, and Government Strategies and Investments. Average grades for all indicators combined were highest (best) in Denmark, Slovenia, and the Netherlands.

Many surveillance and research gaps were apparent, especially for the Active Play and Family and Peers indicators. International cooperation and cross-fertilization is encouraged to address existing challenges, understand underlying determinants, conceive innovative solutions, and mitigate the global childhood inactivity crisis. The paradox of higher physical activity and lower sedentary behavior in countries reporting poorer infrastructure, and lower physical activity and higher sedentary behavior in countries reporting better infrastructure, suggests that autonomy to play, travel, or chore requirements and/or fewer attractive sedentary pursuits, rather than infrastructure and structured activities, may facilitate higher levels of physical activity.


The proportion of countries with good grades (A, B or C) on each common physical activity indicator.

Overall Physical Activity

26%

Organized Sport Participation

61%

Active Play

24%

Active Transportation

79%

Sedentary Behaviours

29%

Family & Peers

34%

School

59%

Community & Built Environment

47%

Government Strategies & Investments

61%

Comparing the proportion of countries with good grades (A, B or C) on each common physical activity indicator between 2014 and 2016.

 

  • GLOBAL MATRIX 1.0 (2014)

  • GLOBAL MATRIX 2.0 (2016)

OPA = Overall Physical Activity, OSP = Organized Sport Participation, AP = Active Play, AT = Active Transportation, SB = Sedentary Behaviours, FP = Family & Peers, SCH = School, CBE = Community & Built Environment, GSI = Government Strategies & Investments

A

We are succeeding with a large majority of children and youth (≥ 80%).

D

We are succeeding with less than half but some children and youth (20-39%).

B

We are succeeding with well over half of children and youth (60-79%).

F

We are succeeding with very few children and youth (<20%).

C

We are succeeding with about half of children and youth (40-59%).

INC

Incomplete – inadequate information to assign a grade.

CountryContinentIncomeInequalityOverall Physical ActivityOrganized Sport ParticipationActive PlayActive TransportationSedentary BehavioursFamily & PeersSchoolCommunity & Built EnvironmentGovernment Strategies & Investments
Australia Oceania High Income Low Inequality 21D- 14B 23INC 18C- 21D- 16C+ 15B- 12A- 20D
Belgium Europe High Income Low Inequality 21F+ 18C- 16C+ 18C- 21D- 23INC 15B- 23INC 16C+
Brazil South America Upper Middle Income High Inequality 18C- 23INC 23INC 16C+ 19D+ 16C+ 23INC 23INC 20D
Canada North America High Income Low Inequality 21D- 14B 19D+ 20D 22F 16C+ 14B 12A- 15B-
Chile South America High Income High Inequality 22F 20D 23INC 18C- 20D 20D 20D 17C 17C
China Asia Upper Middle Income Moderate Inequality 22F 22F 21D- 18C- 22F 14B 13B+ 19D+ 20D
Colombia South America Upper Middle Income High Inequality 20D 17C 23INC 20D 20D 23INC 20D 17C 14B/B
Denmark Europe High Income Low Inequality 19D+ 11A 23INC 14B 23INC 23INC 14B 13B+ 12A-
England Europe High Income Low Inequality 21D- 20D 23INC 18C- 23INC 23INC 13B+ 14B 23INC
Estonia Europe High Income Low Inequality 22F 17C 23INC 23INC 22F 17C 17C 14B 17C
Finland Europe High Income Low Inequality 20D 17C 17C 14B 20D 17C 14B 14B 14B
Ghana Africa Lower Middle Income Moderate Inequality 20D 17C 14B 17C 20D 22F 20D 22F 20D
Hong Kong Asia High Income Inequality 20D 18C- 23INC 14B 17C 20D 17C 14B 23INC
India Asia Lower Middle Income Low Inequality 18C- 23INC 23INC 17C 17C 23INC 23INC 23INC 20D
Ireland Europe High Income Low Inequality 20D 17C-/C+ 23INC 20D 18C- 23INC 20D 13B+ 23INC
Japan Asia High Income Low Inequality 23INC 17C 23INC 14B 17C 20D 14B 20D 14B
Kenya Africa Lower Middle Income High Inequality 17C 17C 14B 14B 14B 20D 17C 20D 17C
Korea, Republic of Asia High Income Inequality 21D- 18C- 23INC 16C+ 22F 23INC 20D 23INC 17C
Malaysia Asia Upper Middle Income High Inequality 20D 23INC 23INC 20D 20D 23INC 14B 23INC 14B
Mexico North America Upper Middle Income High Inequality 17C 20D 21D- 17C 20D 23INC 21D- 20D 17C
Mozambique Africa Low Income High Inequality 17C 22F 20D 17C 23INC 23INC 20D 22F 22F
Netherlands Europe High Income Low Inequality 20D 14B 14B 11A 17C 14B 17C 11A 23INC
New Zealand Oceania High Income Inequality 15B- 16C+ 15B- 17C 17C 17C 16C+ 14B 15B-
Nigeria Africa Lower Middle Income Moderate Inequality 17C 23INC 17C 14B 22F 23INC 18C- 23INC 14B
Poland Europe High Income Low Inequality 20D 20D 23INC 17C 20D 17C 14B 17C 17C
Portugal Europe High Income Low Inequality 20D 14B 20D 17C 20D 17C 14B 20D 17C
Qatar Asia High Income Inequality 22F 20D 23INC 23INC 20D 20D 23INC 23INC 14B
Scotland Europe High Income Low Inequality 22F 23INC 23INC 17C 22F 21D- 24 14B 14B
Slovenia Europe High Income Low Inequality 12A- 15B- 20D 17C 13B+ 23INC 11A 23INC 13B+
South Africa Africa Upper Middle Income High Inequality 17C 17C 23INC 17C 22F 18C- 20D 18C- 14B
Spain Europe High Income Low Inequality 21D- 14B 16C+ 17C 20D 23INC 17C 23INC 23INC
Sweden Europe High Income Low Inequality 20D 13B+ 23INC 16C+ 17C 23INC 16C+ 14B 14B
Thailand Asia Upper Middle Income Low Inequality 21D- 17C 22F 14B 21D- 14B 17C 17C 17C
United Arab Emirates Asia High Income Inequality 22D-/F- 23INC 23INC 22D-/F- 18C- 18C- 20D 23INC 13B+
United States North America High Income Moderate Inequality 21D- 18C- 23INC 22F 21D- 23INC 19D+ 15B- 23INC
Venezuela South America Upper Middle Income High Inequality 20D 23INC 23INC 23INC 21D/F 23INC 23INC 23INC 20D
Wales Europe High Income Low Inequality 21D- 17C 17C 17C 21D- 19D+ 14B 17C 15B-
Zimbabwe Africa Low Income Moderate Inequality 16C+ 14B 19D+ 12A- 14B 23INC 20D 22F 20D
CountryContinentIncomeInequalityOverall Physical ActivityOrganized Sport ParticipationActive PlayActive TransportationSedentary BehavioursFamily & PeersSchoolCommunity & Built EnvironmentGovernment Strategies & Investments


Interactive Map

Click on shaded countries to view the grades and other resources.

Resources

Read each Report Card Leader’s bio and view related resources.

Australia
Australia
Belgium
Brazil
Nelson Nardo Junior, Ph.D.
Canada
Chile
Nicolas Aguilar-Farias, M.S. ClinExPhys
China
Colombia
Silvia González, M.P.H.
Denmark
Lisbeth Runge Larsen, Ph.D.
England
Estonia
Jaak Jürimäe, Ph.D.
Finland
Tuija Tammelin, Ph.D.
Ghana
Reginald Ocansey, Ph.D.
Hong Kong
Stephen H.S. Wong, Ph.D., FACSM, R.Nutr.
India
Tarun Katapally, M.S., Ph.D.
Kenya
Vincent Onywera, Ph.D.
Korea, Republic of
Malaysia
Razinah Sharif, Ph.D.
Mexico
Juan López Taylor, Ph.D.
Mozambique
Netherlands
Tim Takken, Ph.D.
New Zealand
Nigeria
Poland
Portugal
Jorge Mota, Ph.D.
Qatar
Mohamed Ghaith Al-Kuwari, M.D.
Scotland
Slovenia
Shawnda A. Morrison, Ph.D.
South Africa
Estelle Lambert, Ph.D.
Spain
Blanca Roman Viñas, M.D., Ph.D.
Thailand
Areekul Amornsriwatanakul, M.B.A.
United Arab Emirates
United States
Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Ph.D., FACSM, FTOS, FAHA
Venezuela
Marianella Herrera, M.D.
Wales
Gareth Stratton, Ph.D.
Zimbabwe
Taru Manyanga, Ph.D. student
Zimbabwe
Daga Makaza, Ph.D. student

Gallery

View photos from the 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health in Bangkok, Thailand, where the Global Matrix 2.0 was released on November 16, 2016.

Get Involved in the Global Matrix 3.0

We are planning to release the next Global Matrix in 2018. If you are interested in leading the development of the report card for your country, please let us know.