The Global Matrix 1.0 on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

Released on May 20th, 2014 at the 2014 Global Summit on the Physical Activity of Children in Toronto, Canada.

15

Countries

5

Continents

135

Grades

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The Grades

Search the matrix below with the filters or sort the grades by clicking on the column headers.

The Active Healthy Kids Canada (AHKC) Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth has been effective in powering the movement to get kids moving by influencing priorities, policies, and practice in Canada. The AHKC Report Card process was replicated in 14 additional countries from 5 continents using 9 common indicators (Overall Physical Activity, Organized Sport Participation, Active Play, Active Transportation, Sedentary Behavior, Family and Peers, School, Community and Built Environment, and Government Strategies and Investments), a harmonized process and a standardized grading framework. The 15 Report Cards were presented at the Global Summit on the Physical Activity of Children in Toronto on May 20, 2014. The consolidated findings are summarized here in the form of a global matrix of grades.

There is a large spread in grades across countries for most indicators. Countries that lead in certain indicators lag in others. Overall, the grades for indicators of physical activity (PA) around the world are low/poor. Many countries have insufficient information to assign a grade, particularly for the Active Play and Family and Peers indicators. Grades for Sedentary Behaviors are, in general, better in low income countries. The Community and Built Environment indicator received high grades in high income countries and notably lower grades in low income countries. There was a pattern of higher PA and lower sedentary behavior in countries reporting poorer infrastructure, and lower PA and higher sedentary behavior in countries reporting better infrastructure, which presents an interesting paradox.

Many surveillance and research gaps and weaknesses were apparent. International cooperation and cross-fertilization is encouraged to tackle existing challenges, understand underlying mechanisms, derive innovative solutions, and overcome the expanding childhood inactivity crisis.


The proportion of countries with good grades (A, B or C) on each common physical activity indicator.

Overall Physical Activity

33%

Organized Sport Participation

67%

Active Play

27%

Active Transportation

60%

Sedentary Behaviours

27%

Family & Peers

33%

School

64%

Community & Built Environment

53%

Government Strategies & Investments

60%
A  
We are succeeding with a large majority of children and youth (≥ 80%).
D  
We are succeeding with less than half but some children and youth (20-39%).
B  
We are succeeding with well over half of children and youth (60-79%).
F  
We are succeeding with very few children and youth (<20%).
C  
We are succeeding with about half of children and youth (40-59%).
INC  
Incomplete – inadequate information to assign a grade.

CountryContinentIncomeInequalityOverall Physical ActivityOrganized Sport ParticipationActive PlayActive TransportationSedentary BehavioursFamily & PeersSchoolCommunity & Built EnvironmentGovernment Strategies & Investments
Australia Oceania High Income Low Inequality 21D- 15B- 23INC 20D 21D- 17C 15B- 12A- 16C+
Canada North America High Income Low Inequality 21D- 16C+ 23INC 20D 22F 17C 16C+ 13B+ 17C
Colombia South America Upper Middle Income High Inequality 20D 20D 23INC 23INC 20D 23INC 22F 23INC 14B
England Europe High Income Low Inequality 19D+ 18C- 23INC 17C 23INC 23INC 12A- 14B 23INC
Finland Europe High Income Low Inequality 20D 17C 20D 14B 20D 17C 14B 14B 14B
Ghana Africa Lower Middle Income Moderate Inequality 20D 17C 23INC 20D 14B 23INC 20D 20D 20D
Ireland Europe High Income Low Inequality 21D- 18C- 23INC 20D 18C- 23INC 18C- 14B 23INC
Kenya Africa Lower Middle Income High Inequality 17C 17C 17C 17C 14B 17C 17C 23INC 17C
Mexico North America Upper Middle Income High Inequality 16C+ 20D 23INC 15B- 20D 23INC 20D 22F 17C
Mozambique Africa Low Income High Inequality 14B 22F 17C 14B 23INC 23INC 17C 22F 17C
New Zealand Oceania High Income Inequality 14B 14B 14B 18C- 17C 17C 15B- 17C 23INC
Nigeria Africa Lower Middle Income Moderate Inequality 17C 23INC 18C- 14B 22F 23INC 23INC 23INC 23INC
Scotland Europe High Income Low Inequality 22F 23INC 23INC 17C 22F 21D- 24 14B 14B
South Africa Africa Upper Middle Income High Inequality 20D 17C 23INC 17C 22F 23INC 20D 20D 14B
United States North America High Income Moderate Inequality 21D- 18C- 23INC 22F 20D 23INC 18C- 15B- 23INC
CountryContinentIncomeInequalityOverall Physical ActivityOrganized Sport ParticipationActive PlayActive TransportationSedentary BehavioursFamily & PeersSchoolCommunity & Built EnvironmentGovernment Strategies & Investments


Interactive Map

Click on shaded countries to view the grades and other resources.

Resources

Read each Report Card Leader’s bio and view related resources.

Australia
Grant Tomkinson, Ph.D.
Canada
Mark S. Tremblay, Ph.D.
Colombia
Silvia González, M.P.H.
England
Martyn Standage, Ph.D.
Finland
Tuija Tammelin, Ph.D.
Ghana
Reginald Ocansey, Ph.D.
Ireland
Sarahjane Belton, Ph.D.
Ireland
Marie Murphy, Ph.D.
Kenya
Vincent Onywera, Ph.D.
Juan López Taylor
Juan López Taylor
Mexico
Juan López Taylor, Ph.D.
Mozambique
António Prista, Ph.D.
New Zealand
Ralph Maddison, Ph.D.
Nigeria
Kingsley K. Akinroye, M.D.
Scotland
John Reilly, Ph.D.
South Africa
Estelle Lambert, Ph.D.
United States
Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Ph.D., FACSM, FTOS, FAHA

Get Involved in the Global Matrix 3.0

We are planning to release the next Global Matrix in 2018. If you are interested in leading the development of the report card for your country, please let us know.